Doing the Ordinary is Just as Important

Ordinary-FeatureCurrently I’m reading (listening because I retain more information when I listen vs. staring at a page with a bunch of small letters) to a book titled The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck by Mark Manson. So far, this book is very interesting and really draws you in with real stories from Mark’s life and other stories of very important people in history he has studied. It’s definitely not your typical “self-help” book and if you’re not accustomed to curse words and brutal honesty, this one isn’t for you. Mark talks about something in particular that really stood out to me: adversity and failure are tools that we can use to our benefit to sculpt us into mentally tough individuals. Just “feeling good” about yourself isn’t enough. You should have quality reasoning behind feeling good about yourself. Mark talks about how we have become an “entitled” society. Where we feel like when we go through things that are challenging and hard, that we deserve to be treated better than everyone else. Like you’re special. We all come from a place where we are mediocre at things in our life. Those who have success are those that become obsessed with the CONSISTENT ACTION of doing the ordinary things. Ordinary things like hard ass work. Mark’s whole message behind this is that you can always try to be the best at something. But, even though society/media tells us that we must live a life full of the extraordinary (that’s what brings them the $), being average and doing ordinary things are completely ok and necessary to gain your version of success. When you accept that you are what your work ethic represents, you will be able to improve yourself at the things you desire/don’t desire to do. “The knowledge and acceptance of your own mundane existence will actually free you to accomplish what you truly wish to accomplish, without judgment or lofty expectations.” Hold yourself accountable for doing the ordinary things and everything will eventually fall into place.

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